Martin Storey KAL square 1 – Moss Heart

Clue 1 for the KAL landed on Thursday, have you started yours yet? Unfortunately I’ve been off work all week with back problems and the amount of time I can comfortably sit, stand or do anything other than lie down has been small. Nonetheless, I managed to make a start and blog it too It’s been a welcome break from endless hours of staring at the TV, although thank goodness for Amazon Prime helping me keep some semblance of sanity!

So this clue is a chart and I saw on Ravelry that quite a few people missed having written instructions. Personally I always prefer a chart if possible as I find it much easier to identify how the pattern is formed (by which I mean when to change between stitch types etc) and commit it to memory. The heart was actually pretty easy, I did the central chunk of the first one from memory and almost the entire second square from memory too!

These were the mental markers I picked up from the chart so that I only had to refer to it on occasion:

  • Top and bottom edging is 5 rows of garter stitch (knit every row)
  • Always knit the first and last 3 stitches on every row
  • Other than the edging and the heart shape the square is stocking stitch, so knit on the right side and purl on the wrong side
  • The heart pattern starts on the wrong side, by knitting the middle stitch
  • When working the heart pattern on the right side, always match the previous row done on the wrong side (knit the knits and purl the purls)
  • When working the heart pattern on the wrong side, start the double moss stitch one stitch earlier than on the previous row and end it one stitch later
  • Continue making the heart wider till it is 25 stitches wide (or contains 13 purl stitches when viewing the right side)

Other than that I only had to check the chart to remind me how many stocking stitch rows were required between the top/bottom edging and the heart pattern, plus a quick glance to remember how to do the shaping at the top of the heart.

Once you can read a pattern and take those visual clues, it’s much easier than reading numbers of knit and purl stitches. It’s far harder with written instructions to glean how the pattern changes from row to row. A good chart aids knitting from memory, and therefore you can knit more quickly as you don’t have to rely on the instructions for every row. It also looks like your knitting so it’s far easier to tell from a chart where you are and pick up anything you need to know for the next row. I hope that glimpse into my knitting brain is a useful insight for anyone getting used to charts!

As of this evening I’ve knit and blocked a couple of squares and I’m really pleased with them! You’ll find that they curl a lot once finished so will definitely need blocking. You can see my previous post about blocking with a board and wires for a really efficient way to block lots of squares at once. As I just had a couple to block and didn’t feel up to digging out my board and wires, I just rinsed them and pinned them out on a towel. You can block just as easily that way, but take extra care to ensure they are blocked square. As well as measuring each side to check they are all 20cm, you can also measure the diagonal to ensure you’ve not pulled the square out of aspect. The diagonal between opposite corners (AKA the hypotenuse) for a 20cm square is 28.3cm so check that measurement too and you’ve definitely got a perfectly pinned square!

Square 1 - Moss Heart

2 Comments

  • Karen

    26 November 2016 at 13:28 Reply

    Dear Sarah thank you so much for that clue – it saved my sanity as I am a beginner knitter and got totally confused by the chart in the pattern and the key stating “knit on rs,pearl on ws”. Why couldn’t it simply just say knit 5 rows garter stitch as you have done?! I was beginning to feel really fed up after many attempts, but you saved the day. Karen x

    • Sarah

      26 November 2016 at 13:47 Reply

      Hi Karen, I’m so glad that my post was helpful! Working from charts can be a bit tricky because the chart shows you what the result needs to look like on the right side (or the front) of the knitting, but of course you actually work every other row on the wrong side (or the back) of the knitting when you are making a flat piece like this. So if you need a knit stitch on the front but you’re working the a row on the back you actually have to purl. It’s counter-intuitive until you get used to it!

      Just remember that the back of a knit stitch is a purl stitch, and the back of a purl stitch is a knit stitch 🙂

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